Centipedes are Carnivorous Insects

Many Centipede Species Contribute to a Healthy Ecosystem

Centipedes are carnivorous insects and natural predators. Although their eyes are only capable of discerning light and dark, their extremely sensitive antennae are more than adequate for locating their prey. Like spiders, these insects are important in maintaining healthy ecosystems by feeding on other damaging insects.

Most adult centipedes prefer moist, dark, quiet places during winter and place their eggs in dampened soil during spring or summer. As insects, centipedes live abnormally long lives; most usually survive up to a year in the wild, although some have been known to like up to six years. Centipedes do no roam during the daytime, but they will sometimes make inroads into human habitations and seek damp areas in bathrooms, closets, basements, and other similar spaces.

Unlike termites, centipedes are unlikely to consume wood. Millipedes, however, are herbivores and detritivores, and feed exclusively on dead or decaying plant material as well as cellulose-based materials like wood.

While some pests like cockroaches or mice may leaving visual clues that they’ve been using your home as shelter, no such indicators exist for a centipede infestation apart from actually seeing the centipede itself.

In North America, the most commonly encountered centipede is the house centipede which ranges from 25 to 38 mm in length. This particular species possesses extremely long legs and has the ability to travel on both floors and walls without issue.

As mentioned above, centipedes are carnivorous insects, which means that limiting their access to potential food sources is a step in the right direction when it comes to eliminating them from the home. It’s for this reason that a comprehensive approach to pest control is best; ideally, your pest control expert will be able to identify all species of pests that may be invading your home, and from there, he or she can put the most effective control method for your home.

While the venom produced by these pests is not fatal, the bite from some larger species of centipede can be as painful as a bee sting and can lead to severe pain, numbness, discoloration, and inflammation of the afflicted area.

For common house centipedes, commercially available sticky traps may be enough to stem the population of these pests in a given area. Moreover, these traps will be able to give you a more accurate idea of where these pests are coming from, as well as the routes they’re taking to get around your home.

If an infestation is confirmed, it’s recommended that homeowners take special care to seal off uncommonly moist areas like bathrooms and reduce entry points to the outside like cracks and crevices.

Cantu Pest Control is proud to be the first company in Texas to offer a Green Shield Certified Service. Our Dallas centipede control experts are excited to offer Green Shield Certified pest services to our customers in search of a more prevention-based solution to their pest removal and on-going pest management needs while minimizing the use of pesticides.

If centipedes have made unwanted appearances around your home, call Cantu Pest Control at 972-885-3618 (Dallas and Fort Worth areas) or 713-999-3495 (Houston area) and schedule an appointment today with one of our friendly, experienced centipede removal experts.

The Challenges of Centipede Removal

Pesticides and Traps Are Viable Methods of Centipede Removal

Despite the average homeowner’s desire to practice thorough centipede control, these insects are important in maintaining healthy ecosystems by feeding on other damaging insects.

Centipedes are carnivorous insects and natural predators. Although their eyes are only capable of discerning light and dark, their extremely sensitive antennae are more than adequate for locating their prey.

Most adult centipedes prefer moist, dark, quiet places during winter and place their eggs in dampened soil during spring or summer. As insects, centipedes live abnormally long lives; most usually survive up to a year in the wild, although some have been known to like up to six years.

Centipedes do no roam during the daytime, but they will sometimes make inroads into human habitations and seek damp areas in bathrooms, closets, basements, and other similar spaces.

Unlike termites, centipedes are unlikely to consume wood. Millipedes, however, are herbivores and detritivores, and feed exclusively on dead or decaying plant material as well as cellulose-based materials like wood.

While some pests like cockroaches or mice may leaving visual clues that they’ve been using your home as shelter, no such indicators exist for a centipede infestation apart from actually seeing the centipede itself.

In North America, the most commonly encountered centipede is the house centipede which ranges from 25 to 38 mm in length. This particular species possesses extremely long legs and has the ability to travel on both floors and walls without issue.

As mentioned above, centipedes are carnivorous insects, which means that limiting their access to potential food sources is a step in the right direction when it comes to eliminating them from the home.

It’s for this reason that a comprehensive approach to centipede removal is best; ideally, your pest control expert will be able to identify all species of pests that may be invading your home, and from there, he or she can put the most effective control method for your home.

While the venom produced by these pests is not fatal, the bite from some larger species of centipede can be as painful as a bee sting and can lead to severe pain, numbness, discoloration, and inflammation of the afflicted area.

For common house centipedes, most centipede removal experts recommend available sticky traps may be enough to stem the population of these pests in a given area.

If an infestation is confirmed, centipede removal experts recommend that homeowners take special care to seal off uncommonly moist areas like bathrooms and reduce entry points to the outside like cracks and crevices.

Cantu Pest Control is proud to be the first company in Texas to offer a Green Shield Certified Service. Our Dallas centipede removal experts are excited to offer Green Shield Certified pest services to our customers in search of a more prevention-based solution to their pest removal and on-going pest management needs while minimizing the use of pesticides.

If centipedes have made unwanted appearances around your home, call Cantu Pest Control at 972-885-3618 (Dallas and Fort Worth areas) or 713-999-3495 (Houston area) and schedule an appointment today with one of our friendly, experienced centipede removal experts.

Centipedes as Pests

Agile Centipedes Present Challenge for Pest Control Experts

Centipedes are nocturnal, agile, fast-moving insects and are, therefore, rarely seen by humans in their natural habitats. These insects can be found all throughout North America and, depending on the species in question, can live in a variety of geographic regions and environments. The name “centipede” is somewhat of a misnomer, because in reality they can have anywhere from 15 to 177 pairs of legs. They are elongated insects with flat, segmented bodies and possess one pair of legs per segment. Most centipedes appear brown or reddish-orange in color. Centipedes have long, sensitive antennae which they use to track prey. They are carnivorous insects and possess venomous claw-like structures to trap and paralyze prey: usually worms, spiders, and small vertebrae.

Most adult centipedes prefer moist, dark, quiet places during winter and place their eggs in dampened soil during spring or summer. As insects, centipedes live abnormally long lives; most usually survive up to a year in the wild, although some have been known to like up to six years. Centipedes do no roam during the daytime, but they will sometimes make inroads into human habitations and seek damp areas in bathrooms, closets, basements, and other similar spaces.

Unlike termites, centipedes are unlikely to consume wood. Millipedes, however, are herbivores and detritivores, and feed exclusively on dead or decaying plant material as well as cellulose-based materials like wood.

While some pests like cockroaches or mice may leaving visual clues that they’ve been using your home as shelter, no such indicators exist for a centipede infestation apart from actually seeing the centipede itself. In North America, the most commonly encountered centipede is the house centipede which ranges from 25 to 38 mm in length. This particular species possesses extremely long legs and has the ability to travel on both floors and walls without issue.

As mentioned above, centipedes are carnivorous insects, which means that limiting their access to potential food sources is a step in the right direction when it comes to eliminating them from the home. It’s for this reason that a comprehensive approach to pest control is best; ideally, your pest control expert will be able to identify all species of pests that may be invading your home, and from there, he or she can put the most effective control method for your home. While the venom produced by these pests is not fatal, the bite from some larger species of centipede can be as painful as a bee sting and can lead to severe pain, numbness, discoloration, and inflammation of the afflicted area.

For common house centipedes, commercially available sticky traps may be enough to stem the population of these pests in a given area. Moreover, these traps will be able to give you a more accurate idea of where these pests are coming from, as well as the routes they’re taking to get around your home. If an infestation is confirmed, it’s recommended that homeowners take special care to seal off uncommonly moist areas like bathrooms and reduce entry points to the outside like cracks and crevices.

If centipedes have made an appearance in your home, call Cantu Pest Control at 972-885-3618 (Dallas and Fort Worth areas) or 713-999-3495 (Houston area) and schedule an appointment today with one of our friendly, experienced pest control experts.

What is a Pesticide?

By definition, a pesticide is a chemical that is used to prevent or repel pests.  We commonly think of pesticides used to manage termites, ants, or bees that cause damage to our family or our home. However, pests can be any insect, rodent, bacteria, virus, fungi, plant, or other organism that causes harm or disease to our environment. Despite the negative connotation of pesticides, they are not all bad by definition.  Insect repellents and mildew sprays are considered pesticides and are monitored under the same strict requirements as any other, more potent pesticide.  Consider that algaecide used in fish aquariums and pools and disinfectants used to clean kitchen counters are pesticides that are highly regulated under state and federal law. The Office of Pesticide Programs of the Environmental Protection Agency or EPA regulates pesticides in the United States.

There are many types of pesticides and they vary in purpose.  For instance, insecticides control insects while herbicides control weeds. Common pesticides found in most homes include insect sprays, repellants, cleaners, and pool chemicals.  Review the following chart for common pesticides.

As seen in the table above, pesticides are designed to mitigate one or more pests.  Pesticides typically have a few active ingredients that are biochemically engineered, biologically engineered, or perhaps naturally occurring to combat a particular pest.  Pesticides that are biologically engineered or found to be naturally occurring are typically safer and more effective than those biochemically engineered.  Additionally, pesticides are primarily made up of inert ingredients.  In fact, inert ingredients make up over ninety percent of the product.  Thus, consider what you are using from over the counter and always read the labels.  If you have any questions, feel free to contact your local pest control professional at Cantu Pest Control.

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Harvestmen

What are Harvestmen?

Harvestmen are more commonly known as “daddy long legs.”  Although there are thirty seven families and six thousand five hundred species, “daddy long legs” refers to only one family of Harvestmen, the Phalangiidae.  With such a profound number of species, harvestmen can be found almost anywhere in the world.  Interestingly enough, eighteen families of harvestmen can be found in Texas.

The old legend claims that “daddy long legs” or harvestmen are the most venomous animal in the world; but they do not have fangs long enough or a mouth conducive to biting a human being.  This tale, however, is nothing but a preposterous tall tale!  Harvestmen do not have glands that contain venom.  Also, the chelicerae or pseudo fangs are simply used to grasp things and are not powerful enough to penetrate the skin of a human being.  Furthermore, harvestmen are slightly pesky nuisances, especially when crawling briskly across you, but they are medically harmless.

Distinctiveness of Harvestmen 

Although most people probably consider them to be spiders, harvestmen differ as spiders have two separate body segments.  Harvestmen have a single, globular body that has a distinctly segmented abdomen.  The two eyes almost appear as if they are glued in place on the surface of the body.  The harvestmen’s eyes do not form images and are used in conjunction with their second pair of legs, pseudo antennae, to delve into their environment.  The body looks much like the body of a crab.  Extending from the single-segmented body are many long spindly legs appearing much like very thick strands of hair.  There are, however, species of harvestmen that have short legs.  Additionally, harvestmen have scent glands just outside the base of their legs that produce an obtrusive odor.  This odor may indeed be the reason that many people believe them to be poisonous.

Living Conditions

Harvestmen, found in covered areas such as caves and beneath logs and other wooded areas, are considered both predators and scavengers.  They prey upon other small insects and arthropods alike, most of which also inhabit wooded areas with overgrown vegetation.  Typical arachnids have a filtering mechanism called a sucking stomach that protects them from parasites.  Harvestmen do not have this filtering mechanism and are prone to internal parasites.   Harvestmen are equal opportunity in that they will eat dead animals, live or dead plant matter, and the feces of most any animal.  These omnivores do hunt their prey but find meals of dung equally delicious!

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