wasps

Identifying and Removing Wasps’ Nests Around Your Home

Red Paper Wasp

Hire an Exterminator for Safe and Effective Wasp Nest Removal

At a glance, it’s sometimes difficult to tell the difference between a wasp and a bee, especially if you’re focusing on net getting stung. The principal difference between wasps and bees is that the former are carnivorous while the later feed on nectar and pollen. Wasps have smooth, sleek bodies with a thin profile, while bees have larger, hairy bodies, which they use for transporting pollen.

They are usually half an inch to three-quarters of an inch long and mainly feed on spiders. These insects are common problems for homeowners all across North America. Like many other insects, they are most active during the summertime.

Wasps can be dangerous, especially to kids who have developed allergic reactions to these pests. To make matters worse, these insects often make their nests in areas that may be inaccessible to some homeowners. Elderly people, in particular, may not have the means to remove a nest on their own. In these instances, nests may be allowed to grow to extreme sizes. Removal of these mega-nests require an exterminator for the occupant’s safety and well-being.

waspsWasps are either solitary or social. Solitary wasps will usually bother human beings unless provoked, and since they’re usually on their own, they really don’t present that great of a threat. Social wasps, on the other hand, can be significantly more dangerous, because they’ll always have back up, as it were, and they can quickly organize themselves into threatening swarms.

Once these social insects have established a nest, they will continue to return to it again and again, at which point they become territorial and have the potential to become highly aggressive. Many wasps prefer to build their nests under protected, shady areas, like under eaves, porch roofs, decks, sheds, and steps. Sometimes their nests are hard to locate because they can maneuver themselves into very small spaces.

One good method to determine exactly where the wasps have nested is to wait until dusk and then observe the flight patterns of the wasps. Just this mild degree of observation is usually enough to determine the general whereabouts of the nest, and even if you can’t find it that night, you may be able to see the nest itself the next day when visibility has improved.

If you are able to determine the exact location of a nest, it’s a good idea to call an exterminator to remove the nest quickly and safely. Homeowners often try to remove wasp nests themselves, but only end up aggravating them instead.

waspsOccasionally, wasps will make their homes inside walls. This is probably the most difficult place from which to remove them, as they’re sheltered from all sides. Also, the wasps can detect noises that a homeowner may make trying to remove them, further angering them and causing them to swarm. If wasps are swarming about your home or office call an exterminator immediately. An exterminator will know exactly how to go about removing them safely without harm to occupants and pets.

Cantu Pest Control is proud to be the first company in Texas to offer a Green Shield Certified Service. Our Dallas wasp control experts are excited to offer Green Shield Certified pest services to our customers in search of a more prevention-based solution to their pest removal and on-going pest management needs while minimizing the use of pesticides.

If wasps have made unwanted appearances around your home, call Cantu Pest Control at 972-885-3618 (Dallas and Fort Worth areas) or 713-999-3495 (Houston area) and schedule an appointment today with one of our friendly, experienced wasp removal experts.

yellow jackets

Yellow Jackets May Create Indoor Nests

yellow jackets

Yellow Jackets Are Beneficial Pests that Can Keep Dangerous Insects In Check

Yellow jackets are a sub-species of wasp that can identified by their black-and-yellow markings which run in rings around the segments of its body. Although yellow jackets are sometimes mistaken for bees by the causal observer, they are much leaner in shape and more streamlined than their fuzzier and rounder counterparts.

Like bees, yellow jackets are pollinators, although they are technically predatory scavengers and will feed on other insects, meat, and fish, as well as sugary substances. Their wide preference of foodstuffs means that they can be particular nuisances around garbage cans and picnics.

Yellow jackets are social insects and live in nests with thousands of individuals at a time. Most yellow jackets prefer to nest on the ground, and their colonies are often found underneath porches, steps, crawlspaces, and at the base of trees. Occasionally, yellow jackets will nest inside the hollows of walls, especially in older houses. Others, however, will make their nests off the ground, often in the branches of trees of in the rafters of man-made structures.

yellow jacketsMost of the time, yellow jacket populations will die during the cold winter months. Sometimes, however, the population manages to live on, especially if their nest happens to be in a particularly sheltered location, which may allow a yellow jacket population to continue growing until it reaches upwards of one million members.

Yellow jackets can be aggressive insects, especially when their nest is threatened. Unlike bees, yellow jackets have the capacity to sting a target multiple times, thanks to their slender stinger and small barb-like point. Depending on the person, yellow jacket venom has the ability to cause severe allergic reaction which may even prove to be fatal depending on the number of times the person in question has been stung.

Despite the potential health risks they pose to humans, yellow jackets are beneficial pests that prey on a variety of damaging insects. Unless their nest is directly threatened, yellow jackets are usually to loath to sting, although they can occasionally become a nuisance to humans and pets, at which point a pest control expert should be consulted. For ground-level or below-ground nests, it’s common practice for pest control experts to employ an insecticide dust, which is administered in and around the nest entrance.

yellow jacketsThe matter becomes slightly more complicated when yellow jackets nest inside structures, however, as their entrance must be sealed until all the members of the colony are dead. Otherwise, the living members of the colony will try to escape through the inside of the structure, creating a stinging hazard for all the human occupants that happen to be inside.

Cantu Pest Control is proud to be the first company in Texas to offer a Green Shield Certified Service. Our Dallas yellow jacket removal experts are excited to offer Green Shield Certified pest services to our customers in search of a more prevention-based solution to their pest removal and on-going pest management needs while minimizing the use of pesticides.

If yellow jackets have made unwanted appearances around your home, call Cantu Pest Control at 972-885-3618 (Dallas and Fort Worth areas) or 713-999-3495 (Houston area) and schedule an appointment today with one of our friendly, experienced yellow jacket removal experts.

Red paper wasps

Differences Between Wasps and Hornets

wasps

Similarities Between Hornets and Wasps Often Confuse Homeowners

Hornets and wasps can be an unsightly addition to your home, can be very territorial and can be dangerously painful if encountered. If you have a hornet’s nest that is too close to your home it is best to consult a professional exterminator for help.

Wasp is a general term, such as ant or bee that is used as an umbrella to cover a large array of stinging pests. Some specific names that fall under the category of wasp include yellow jackets, mud daubers, hornets, paper wasps and pollen wasps.

All wasps have general physical characteristics that they share with one another including exoskeletons that cover their head, thorax, and their long narrow bodies, two pairs of wings of different lengths, two antennae and a stinger that can be used multiple times. Hornets are two inches in length and can range anywhere from yellow and black to white and black in color. Hornets actually feed on other insects and can help control a local environment’s pest infestations much the same way that ants and spiders can.

waspsWasps can be categorized into two types: solitary and social, and hornets are considered to be social wasps. Social wasps are made up of colonies much like ants where there is a queen that will build the beginnings of a nest and give birth to offspring that will stay and help to defend, raise new offspring, and continue to build the nest.

Due to the fact that there are several wasps in one area there will be an established hierarchy of sterile females that will defend and build the nest, and reproductive males and females that will continue on to mate and have more offspring. Hornets will build their football/soccer shaped nests out of paper or wood pulp mixed from saliva under the eaves of houses, in attics or in bushes and trees.

Social wasps also have a specific way that they mate. Before winter a reproductive female will mate with a reproductive male, and store the collected sperm. After hibernating for the winter, the female will build her nest and fertilize the eggs the way she chooses.

waspsAt the beginning all fertilized eggs will produce sterile females to help with the nest, but as the queen runs out of sperm to fertilize eggs the unfertilized eggs will produce male wasps which will help to further future population. After an egg is laid it usually takes around a week for it to hatch and then another 2 weeks to fully develop into an adult hornet.

Cantu Pest Control is proud to be the first company in Texas to offer a Green Shield Certified Service. Our Dallas wasp control experts are excited to offer Green Shield Certified pest services to our customers in search of a more prevention-based solution to their pest removal and on-going pest management needs while minimizing the use of pesticides.

If wasps have made unwanted appearances around your home, call Cantu Pest Control at 972-885-3618 (Dallas and Fort Worth areas) or 713-999-3495 (Houston area) and schedule an appointment today with one of our friendly, experienced wasp removal experts.

wasps

Removing Wasps from Your Home

wasps

Catch Nests in Their Early Stages to Avoid Dangerous Wasp Swarms

At a glance, it’s sometimes difficult to tell the difference between a wasp and a bee, especially if you’re focusing on net getting stung. The principal difference between wasps and bees is that the former are carnivorous while the later feed on nectar and pollen. Wasps have smooth, sleek bodies with a thin profile, while bees have larger, hairy bodies, which they use for transporting pollen.

They are usually half an inch to three-quarters of an inch long and mainly feed on spiders. These insects are common problems for homeowners all across North America. Like many other insects, they are most active during the summertime.

Wasps can be dangerous, especially to kids who have developed allergic reactions to these pests. To make matters worse, these insects often make their nests in areas that may be inaccessible to some homeowners. Elderly people, especially, may not have the means to remove a nest on their own. In these instances, nests may be allowed to grow to extreme sizes, thereby exacerbating the problem through inaction.

waspsWasps are either solitary or social. Solitary wasps will usually bother human beings unless provoked, and since they’re usually on their own, they really don’t present that great of a threat. Social wasps, on the other hand, can be significantly more dangerous, because they’ll always have back up, as it were, and they can quickly organize themselves into threatening swarms.

Once these social insects have established a nest, they will continue to return to it again and again, at which point they become territorial and have the potential to become highly aggressive. Many wasps prefer to build their nests under protected, shady areas, like under eaves, porch roofs, decks, sheds, and steps. Sometimes their nests are hard to locate because they can maneuver themselves into very small spaces.

One good method to determine exactly where the wasps have nested is to wait until dusk and then observe the flight patterns of the wasps. Just this mild degree of observation is usually enough to determine the general whereabouts of the nest, and even if you can’t find it that night, you may be able to see the nest itself the next day when visibility has improved.

If you are able to determine the exact location of a nest, it’s a good idea to call a pest control professional to help you remove the nest quickly and safely. Homeowners often try to remove wasp nests themselves, but only end up aggravating them instead.

waspsOccasionally, wasps will make their homes inside walls. This is probably the most difficult place from which to remove them, as they’re sheltered from all sides. Also, the wasps may detect any hammering or banging that a homeowner may make trying to remove them, further angering them and causing them to swarm. If this situation occurs, call an expert immediately, who will know exactly how to go about removing them.

Cantu Pest Control is proud to be the first company in Texas to offer a Green Shield Certified Service. Our Dallas wasp control experts are excited to offer Green Shield Certified pest services to our customers in search of a more prevention-based solution to their pest removal and on-going pest management needs while minimizing the use of pesticides.

If wasps have made unwanted appearances around your home, call Cantu Pest Control at 972-885-3618 (Dallas and Fort Worth areas) or 713-999-3495 (Houston area) and schedule an appointment today with one of our friendly, experienced wasp removal experts.

wasps

Social Wasps Prove Highly Territorial

wasps

Wasps Build Nests Under Awnings, Decks, and Inside Walls

At a glance, it’s sometimes difficult to tell the difference between a wasp and a bee, especially if you’re focusing on net getting stung. The principal difference between wasps and bees is that the former are carnivorous while the later feed on nectar and pollen. Wasps have smooth, sleek bodies with a thin profile, while bees have larger, hairy bodies, which they use for transporting pollen.

They are usually half an inch to three-quarters of an inch long and mainly feed on spiders. These insects are common problems for homeowners all across North America. Like many other insects, they are most active during the summertime.

Wasps can be dangerous, especially to kids who have developed allergic reactions to these pests. To make matters worse, these insects often make their nests in areas that may be inaccessible to some homeowners. Elderly people, especially, may not have the means to remove a nest on their own. In these instances, nests may be allowed to grow to extreme sizes, thereby exacerbating the problem through inaction.

Wasps are either solitary or social. Solitary wasps will usually bother human beings unless provoked, and since they’re usually on their own, they really don’t present that great of a threat. Social wasps, on the other hand, can be significantly more dangerous, because they’ll always have back up, as it were, and they can quickly organize themselves into threatening swarms.

Once these social insects have established a nest, they will continue to return to it again and again, at which point they become territorial and have the potential to become highly aggressive. Many wasps prefer to build their nests under protected, shady areas, like under eaves, porch roofs, decks, sheds, and steps. Sometimes their nests are hard to locate because they can maneuver themselves into very small spaces.

One good method to determine exactly where the wasps have nested is to wait until dusk and then observe the flight patterns of the wasps. Just this mild degree of observation is usually enough to determine the general whereabouts of the nest, and even if you can’t find it that night, you may be able to see the nest itself the next day when visibility has improved.

If you are able to determine the exact location of a nest, it’s a good idea to call a pest control professional to help you remove the nest quickly and safely. Homeowners often try to remove wasp nests themselves, but only end up aggravating them instead.

Occasionally, wasps will make their homes inside walls. This is probably the most difficult place from which to remove them, as they’re sheltered from all sides. Also, the wasps may detect any hammering or banging that a homeowner may make trying to remove them, further angering them and causing them to swarm. If this situation occurs, call an expert immediately, who will know exactly how to go about removing them.

If wasps have made unsightly appearances around your home, call Cantu Pest Control at 972-885-3618 (Dallas and Fort Worth areas) or 713-999-3495 (Houston area) and schedule an appointment today with one of our friendly, experienced pest control experts.

wasps

Removing Wasps’ Nests

wasps

Wasps around the world prefer different nest-building techniques

As summer kicks into high gear, homeowners will most likely encounter two common types of wasps. One type is known as a solitary wasp. Solitary wasps can be further divided into three separate categories, depending on how they go about building their nests. These types of solitary wasps include squatters, builders, and diggers. Many wasp species, like the ones mentioned, paralyze their prey instead of killing it, so that it will not rot before the larvae get a chance to derive nutrient from it.

Some nesting wasps, known as squatters, usually use holes that already exist in wooden planks or those created by wood-boring beetles. Other species, known as builders, create nests from materials found in their near vicinity. This material can sometimes be a papery or cellulose-based and it stuck together in a hive shape by a vast number of workers. These builders are also sometimes known as Potters or Masons. The third type, diggers, prefer to dig holes in the ground which they then use for nesting purposes. This particular group can actually be divided again to another four sub-categories, including pushers, pullers, carriers, and scrapers. These four classifications are fairly self-explanatory, and merely describe how the diggers as a collective go about making their nests.

Yellow Jackets have slightly different styles of building nests and protecting themselves from harm. Their nests are covered with a papery sort of substance and are very frequently found within wall cavities or voids. These locations tend to provide excellent protection from the elements for the colonies that utilize them wisely. When their nest is threatened, yellow jackets tend to be very aggressive as well and will attack their target in large numbers. Yellow jackets are particularly active in late summer, and statistics have proven that the number of yellow jacket stings seems to peak in late summer.

Bald faced hornets, another species of wasp, build nests that are covered in a papery shell, not unlike other wasp species. Like yellow jackets, bald faced hornets tend to build their nests in natural voids or cavities like hollow tree trunks or the hollows of walls.

Mud daubers, uniquely, build their nests from mud or clay, and they typically resemble small tubes or chutes. These strange and eye-catching nests are usually built in existing or natural cracks or crevices in masonry, stone, timber, and they’re also frequently found in the rafters of outdoor structures like the roof awnings of homes, sheds, or garages.

It’s completely understandable that if you discover wasps or yellow jackets on your property, it’s not likely that you’ll care to take the time to determine the exact species before you reach for the garden hose or pesticide. However, your local pest control professional will be able to ascertain the exact genus of the offending insect, and the most effective methods for extermination.

If wasps have made unsightly appearances around your home, call Cantu Pest Control at 972-885-3618 (Dallas and Fort Worth areas) or 713-999-3495 (Houston area) and schedule an appointment today with one of our friendly, experienced pest control experts.

wasps

Wasps and Nest Building

wasps

Nest-Building Wasps Are Highly Protective of Their Territory

Among the threatening species of flying wasps, there are two main types: social wasps and solitary wasps. Social wasps, such as yellow jackets, hornets, and paper wasps have larger populations that solitary wasps like mud daubers. One way to identify stinging wasps is by their wings when they are at rest. When stinging wasps are grounded, they fold their wings lengthwise, which makes the seems nearly half as wide as they actually are.

Many species of wasp make their nests from wood fibers which produce a paper-like shell over time. There are a number of different building styles that tend to differ from species to species. For example, paper wasps tend to build open and exposed nests that look like upside-down umbrellas. These nests can grow to impressive size during late summer or autumn, before winter approaches in earnest. Paper wasps tend to be an extremely aggressive species, and will sting with very little provocation if they sense danger approaching. Some paper wasps that survive the winter will begin to build their new nests on top of old ones, which gives the impression that they’re reusing old nesting locations.

Yellow Jackets have slightly different styles of building nests and protecting themselves from harm. Their nests are covered with a papery sort of substance and are very frequently found within wall cavities or voids. These locations tend to provide excellent protection from the elements for the colonies that utilize them wisely. When their nest is threatened, yellow jackets tend to be very aggressive as well and will attack their target in large numbers. Yellow jackets are particularly active in late summer, and statistics have proven that the number of yellow jacket stings seems to peak in late summer.

Bald faced hornets, another species of wasp, build nests that are covered in a papery shell, not unlike other wasp species. Like yellow jackets, bald faced hornets tend to build their nests in natural voids or cavities like hollow tree trunks or the hollows of walls.

Mud daubers, uniquely, build their nests from mud or clay, and they typically resemble small tubes or chutes. These strange and eye-catching nests are usually built in existing or natural cracks or crevices in masonry, stone, timber, and they’re also frequently found in the rafters of outdoor structures like the roof awnings of homes, sheds, or garages.

The best and easiest way to manage wasps on your property is to determine which particular species of wasp is causing problems. Some early warning signs of wasp infestations usually occur in spring when queen wasps build small nests in order to breed the first batch or generation of workers. These workers quickly develop into mature wasps and take over nest building activities for the queen for the remainder of the active season. By mid-summer, wasp nests can attain worrying sizes, and can actually appear quite frightening as they emanate the steady, threatening hum of the workers going about their daily business.

If wasps have made unsightly appearances around your home, call Cantu Pest Control at 972-885-3618 (Dallas and Fort Worth areas) or 713-999-3495 (Houston area) and schedule an appointment today with one of our friendly, experienced pest control experts.

wasps

Yellow Jackets and Nesting

yellow jackets

Yellow Jacket Nests Can Be Hazardous to Humans and Pets

Yellow jackets are a sub-species of wasp that can identified by their black-and-yellow markings which run in rings around the segments of its body. Although yellow jackets are sometimes mistaken for bees by the causal observer, they are much leaner in shape and more streamlined than their fuzzier and rounder counterparts. Like bees, yellow jackets are pollinators, although they are technically predatory scavengers and will feed on other insects, meat, and fish, as well as sugary substances. Their wide preference of foodstuffs means that they can be particular nuisances around garbage cans and picnics.

Not unlike bees, yellow jackets are social insects and live in nests with thousands of individuals at a time. Most yellow jackets prefer to nest on the ground, and their colonies are often found underneath porches, steps, crawlspaces, and at the base of trees. Occasionally, yellow jackets will nest inside the hollows of walls, especially in older houses. Others, however, will make their nests off the ground, often in the branches of trees of in the rafters of man-made structures. Most of the time, yellow jacket populations will die during the cold winter months. Sometimes, however, the population manages to live on, especially if their nest happens to be in a particularly sheltered location, which may allow a yellow jacket population to continue growing until it reaches upwards of one million members.

Yellow jackets can be aggressive insects, especially when their nest is threatened. Unlike bees, yellow jackets have the capacity to sting a target multiple times, thanks to their slender stinger and small barb-like point. Depending on the person, yellow jacket venom has the ability to cause severe allergic reaction which may even prove to be fatal depending on the number of times the person in question has been stung.

Despite the potential health risks they pose to humans, yellow jackets are beneficial pests that prey on a variety of damaging insects. Unless their nest is directly threatened, yellow jackets are usually to loath to sting, although they can occasionally become a nuisance to humans and pets, at which point a pest control expert should be consulted. For ground-level or below-ground nests, it’s common practice for pest control experts to employ an insecticide dust, which is administered in and around the nest entrance. The matter becomes slightly more complicated when yellow jackets nest inside structures, however, as their entrance must be sealed until all the members of the colony are dead. Otherwise, the living members of the colony will try to escape through the inside of the structure, creating a stinging hazard for all the human occupants that happen to be inside.

Some of the same fly-prevention measures can be applied to the prevention of yellow jackets as well. Keeping garbage cans closed and sealed will prevent yellow jackets from seeking out food residue and rotting refuse. Likewise, it’s important to clear away fallen fruit and make sure it doesn’t start to rot on your lawn which will inevitable attract more insects of all kinds to the site.

If yellow jackets have made unsightly appearances around your home, call Cantu Pest Control at 972-885-3618 (Dallas and Fort Worth areas) or 713-999-3495 (Houston area) and schedule an appointment today with one of our friendly, experienced pest control experts.

these pests could cost you LITERALLY millions

The 10 Most Destructive Pests

these pests could cost you LITERALLY millionsHow will YOU protect yourself from these pests?

Those zany kids at the National Pest Management Association are at it again with this list of the ten most destructive pests. In terms of both property damage and health risks, these household pests have been known to wreak havoc on even the most well protected homes.

Termites:

Like ants, termites are among the most successful groups of insects on earth, in as much as they’ve managed to colonize most landmasses, apart from Antarctica. Hundreds of species of termite are economically significant and can cause severe damage to buildings, crops, and forests.

Ticks:

Ticks are actually small arachnids that feed on the blood of mammals. That said, the principal threat that ticks pose is health-related. Ticks are dangerous vectors for Lyme disease (especially on the Eastern seaboard) and various other viruses and bacteria. Some ticks, such as the Australian paralysis tick, is intrinsically venomous and, as the name implies, can cause paralysis.

Carpenter Ants:

Like termites, carpenter ants are known for causing serious structural damage to buildings. However, carpenter ants don’t actually eat the wood they bore through. Rather, they drill elaborate tunnel systems for nesting and breeding purposes. Carpenter ants favor wooden structures with water damage, compounding an already serious and potentially fatal problem.

Aphids:

Aphids pose a mostly agricultural threat, as they feed on the fluids inside plants. Like ants and termites, aphids are hugely successful insects from a zoological standpoint, which is largely due to the fact that they can reproduce asexually. If left unchecked, the honeydew that aphids produce can turn into a mold fungus and can transmit viruses to other plants.

Yellowjackets:

Yellowjackets, along with hornets, paper wasps, and other stinging insects, are responsible for upwards of half a million ER visits every year. Yellowjackets, known colloquially as “wasps,” are known for their characteristic coloring, their occurrence only colonies, and their distinct side-to-side flight pattern prior to landing. Despite the threat they pose to humans, wasps are actually important predators in their own right, commonly hunting other varieties of household pests.

Moles:

These strange creatures like to feed on worms, grubs, and other insects beneath the surface of your lawn. Like many other destructive pests on this list, the mole is perfectly suited to its environment—that is, underground. For example, moles have been known to tolerate higher levels of carbon dioxide than other animals because of a special protein in the blood, allowing them to breathe underground with ease.

Deer:

As your author can attest, deer love to snack on expensive flowers and other outdoor ornamentals. Besides tearing up landscaping, deer can also carry deer ticks, which, in turn, can carry Lyme disease. In some parts of the US, deer populations have escalated unchecked, and have now reached pest-levels.

Mosquitoes:

We all know about the health risks posed by mosquitoes: malaria, west Nile virus, yellow fever, dengue fever, filariasis, and other arboviruses, making them one of the deadliest animals in the world. Mosquitoes can breed in as little as a bottle-cap’s worth of standing water, meaning that homeowners should diligently check their property for potential mosquito breeding locations.

Slugs:

Like worms, slugs play an important role in the ecosystem by eating and decomposing dead plant and animal matter. That said, they’ll just as soon eat live plants as dead ones, and frequently present agricultural problems for farmers and gardeners. Slugs can destroy plants faster than they can grow and bore holes in fruits and vegetables, making them unfit for sale or consumption.

Japanese Beetles:

As the name suggests, Japanese beetles are invasive pests that were initially found in the US sometime in the 1910s. They feed by skeletonizing plants, meaning that they consume only the leaf material between the veins, while leaving the veins themselves relatively untouched.

hornets and wasps

Hornets & Wasps

Hornets and wasps can be an unsightly addition to your home and can be very territorial and dangerously painful if encountered. All wasps have general physical characteristics that they share with one another including exoskeletons that cover their head, thorax, and their long narrow bodies, two pairs of wings of different lengths, two antennae and a stinger that can be used multiple times. If a human comes too close to a hornet’s nest or tries to unsuccessfully eliminate it then hornets are capable of a full on assault resulting in hundreds of hornets attacking a single invader. If a single hornet is killed then their last attempt at protecting the nest will cause them to release a pheromone that will result in the whole nest narrowing in on and attacking the invader. If you have a hornet’s nest that is too close to your home it is best to consult a professional exterminator like Cantu Pest Control for help. Read more